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Corrections by Tracey Emin

  • Correction

    Tuesday, October 16, 2012

    Subject: The Independent, Monday 15th October 2012:Tracey Emin joins our campaign for same sex marriage by calling on the Church to open up. Tracey is deeply upset by the way in which the text that she submitted to the Independent Newspaper has been edited. Her message, that the law does not need to change but the church's attitude does, has been obscured and the ending of the piece was changed to make her sound naive.  "The Independent has changed my voice and my message. I wrote for the Indpendent for four years and they have never edited me in this way before."Tracey Emin, 2012 For full clarfication and an unedited text, please read the following:  I was lucky – I was born with a great deal of faith – It wasn’t taught to me, it wasn’t dictated. It is part of me, part of my blood, my soul. I believe in the past, present and future – a meeting place of parallel worlds. I believe in a greater presence that joins all and I truly believe in an afterworld.Not so much an afterlife but another place, another existence – something we become – a particle of light, a drop in the ocean, a blade of grass, maybe a distant star. But in my heart of hearts I cannot believe in a heaven or hell. I do not believe in a judgement day. The only judgement is our conscience that takes us through this world. When I was a child I forced myself to stop masturbating because I was convinced that if I continued God wouldn’t love me any more. I thought I was on the outside. I thought I was one of the unloved. How can the all-encompassing, the be all and everything, the almighty, reject any one? I’m not religious but there is always a time for God, a time for prayer. “Please God I promise I will never do it again” - usually when I’m purging my soul down a lavatory pan after a hard night drinking. Or on a serious note when my father died or when I have been very ill. Or when I have felt very alone and isolated. But at all times, I never felt excluded by a greater presence. No one should be excluded. On this argument I would say that all adults should be allowed to marry in church in the eyes of God – regardless of sex or gender – love should transcend all – the greater union, the promise of devotion to another, to love and honour, for better or worse, in sickness and health. I recently shared this view with a number of my friends, gay and straight. The majority were not keen on the idea of gay marriage in church. Most of my friends who are gay said they had always been outside of Christianity and never accepted. Why would they want to get married in a religious sense? They were more than happy with civil partnership. I said yes but what if you are gay and Christian? Your love is being rejected by the church. But everyone I spoke to was emphatic that church and state should never interfere with each other.There was much conversation on gay priests and lesbian nuns and the total denial of homosexuality within in the Catholic Church. But what about the Church of England? Had Henry VIII thrown in a quick law about same sex marriage at the same time as divorce the world could now be such a different place.But then came the argument of procreation – marriage in the eyes of God is for the purpose of procreation. But then I recently spoke to some friends who have a considerable age gap between them. She is over thirty years older. At the time of their marriage they could never have had children. But they dearly love each other. Is their marriage wrong? The truth is the church marries hundreds and thousands of gay people – every day more and more people are committing themselves to a life long lie.She, jumping at every opportunity for a threesome, as long as it’s with another woman – and He constantly taking the dog for a walk – jumping in and out of bushes – hanging outside of public toilets waiting for the signal.Or maybe they are more than happy to have an open relationship but does this make the church happy? There is no need for gay people to marry in church, no need for the law to change. But there is a great need for the church to change its perception on homosexuality. Being gay does not exclude you from Love, or the greater love of all.The church should be more kind and understanding to young people coming out. Christians should behave Christian. I have never been married, probably never will be married. But sometimes I fantasise. The fantasy either takes me up the aisle in my local Church, Christ Church Spitalfields – or on a really big ego inflated day, St. Paul’s. But either way, if there is no chance for a man and man or woman and woman, I guess there is no chance for woman and cat.I will just have to meet Docket in the next world.  TRACEY EMIN 2012 

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  • Correction

    Wednesday, March 21, 2012

     It was reported today in the Londoner's Diary that it is impossible to go to a party these days without bumping into me. Since January I have attended two parties. One was the Whitechapel Art + Opera party and the other was the Terrence Higgins Trust Lighthous gala auction at Christies. And tonight will be the Royal Academy Schools Dinner and Auction. All of which are charity commitments, so far from partying, it often involves a lot of hard work. (Woops I forgot about Miami!)

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  • Correction

    Tuesday, November 15, 2011

    A number of newspapers have misunderstood the comments I made about my conversation with the Queen at Turner Contemporary on 11 November 2011. The point that was being made was that Turner Contemporary was a very large space to be showing in along with my shows in Brooklyn, Miami and Buenos Aries. This is a lot to take on showing internationally, as well as in Margate.  

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  • Correction

    Monday, April 11, 2011

    I was deeply upset by this article as I know the artist Dinos Chapman. We have known each other since we were students at the Royal College of Art in the 1980s. Dinos did not attempt to contact me or verify any of his assumptions. For the record, I have not been commissioned by Downing Street to create a work of art. It has been an ongoing conversation with the Government's Arts collection and because of the recession and the cutbacks I have agreed to donate a neon work to them. The Government collection is for everyone and regardless of who is in power at any time the collection can be enjoyed by everybody for future generations. So my donation is not solely to David Cameron and 10 Downing Street, as pompous as it sounds it is actually to the nation. I have also spoken to the Prime Minister and the arts and culture ministers and almost anyone who would listen to me about my deepening concerns of how tuition fees will affect people from less privileged backgrounds. I was lucky enough to not only receive grants and tuition fees but I also received bursaries and awards which made my time as a student possible. I recently spoke at the Oxford union where I expressed my concerns and I gave examples to the students of how they could fight against these cuts that did not involve violence or taking to the streets. I was social secretary of my student union for two years. I went to college at 10 in the morning and I left at 8 in the evening and I worked solidly at weekends whilst doing my MA at the Royal College of Art I attended six days a week from 11 in the morning till 10 at night. The education I received was the greatest opportunity of my life and that is something I will never forget regardless of what Dinos Chapman believes. And it would not have hurt him to have checked with me first before he started inciting hatred.

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  • Correction

    Saturday, March 19, 2011

    Jonathan Rayfern never worked with me either as an assistant or any member of staff in my studio. I was never a friend of his on Facebook and for the record I have never had a Facebook account. Anybody who enters any kind of dialogue with me on Facebook or Twitter is being fooled and deceived. This is not the way I communicate. Tracey Emin

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  • Correction

    Saturday, March 19, 2011

    Richard Brooks rang me up to talk about a neon project I was doing for Frieze Art Fair in October 2009. Right at the end of the conversation he slipped in a fast question; 'What did I think about the 50% tax?'. I spent quite a long time explaining to him that I felt the country was going to wreck and ruin and sliding down the pan and that I couldn't see where my 40% tax was going let alone 50%. Yes, I did say that considering the state of things I wasn't happy to pay 50% tax and when he asked me what I could possibly do about it I did say I could leave the country but not because of paying 50% tax but because I was sick of the state of things. I cited lots of different examples of which I have done frequently in many interviews on this subject. I have always payed my tax in full, I have never avoided any tax payment and my work and practice is synonymous with London and the U.K. I do believe that some countries have a greater leniency in regard to taxing the arts. Even if I were to move to another country, which a lot of artists do as they are able to work anywhere in the world, my taxes would still go through the U.K as this is where I am registered. I only spent 2 months of 2010 in the U.K, but my taxes will still go through this county and I categorically did not say 'Stuff 50% tax, I'm taking my unmade bed to France' which was printed on the front page of the Sunday Times. Tracey Emin

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